Person: Emily Davison

Date: 4th June 1913

Place: Epsom Derby, London

Person: Emily Davison 

What happened:

Emily Davison, a militant suffragette, stepped out in front of the King’s horse, Anmer. Her reasons for doing so are discussed as a way of drawing attention to her cause, attaching a scarf to the horse’s bridle, attaching a WSPU* flag to the bridle, throwing a ‘votes for women’ sash around the horse’s neck. It is generally agreed her intention was not to kill herself but she did die of the injuries sustained four days later. Thousands of suffragettes attended the funeral.

Emily Davison, left, and jockey Herbert Jones fall to the ground after her collision with the King's horse, Anmer. Photograph: Hulton Archive

Emily Davison, left, and jockey Herbert Jones fall to the ground after her collision with the King’s horse, Anmer. Photograph: Hulton Archive

Quotes:

The jockey , Herbert Jones, who rode Anmer: ”haunted by that poor woman’s face”

‘Labour MP Tony Benn has revealed a secret he has long kept hidden in a House of Commons broom cupboard. Beneath the UK’s Parliament, the veteran MP and former peer has placed a plaque with a photo of a leading suffragette who died after throwing herself beneath the king’s horse. In a special edition of BBC One’s Songs of Praise to be shown on Sunday, Mr Benn discloses his memorial and describes it as “one of very few monuments to democracy in the whole building”. Mr Benn says of his plaque, which is draped in suffragette colours: “It is a modest reminder of a great woman with a great cause who never lived to see it prosper but played a significant part in making it possible.”‘ BBC news. 

‘A man standing by tried to prevent her, but she shook herself free shouting ‘I will!’.’ New York Times, 1913. 

“It is hugely significant as a moment in history, a moment that absolutely sums up the desperation of women in this country who wanted the vote.” Clare Balding 

Details to include in a postcard:

Race won by a 100 to 1 outsider.

Ambulances

Roaring crowds

*Women’s Social and Political Union

 

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